Posts Tagged shot set-ups

Scent of a Woman – outsider notes

I’m not actually watching this show–I’m following the recaps at DramaBeans.com zealously, though.

It’s a story with the primary plot-point that a woman discovers she has cancer, so it’s bound to end sadly. There are many tears along the way, too, and stories that BEGIN happily in K-Drama-Land often enough are emotionally wracking toward the middles.

I mean, she's working on her bucket list here.

However, the show looks quite fetching–earnest in its emotions, and pretty in it’s aesthetic. Also, there is tangoing. Which, in a show about life in the face of death, love in the face of anger, and emotional intensity of all kinds… is quite appropriate.

The first encounter between the hero and heroine on the floor escalates, their footsteps faltering with each other, and their grips gradually tightening…

The composition of this scene, the shots interweaving from their faces, the full view of them on the floor, and their hands on each other, is so masterful.

Just the description was enough to send me over to watch it, and then I couldn’t help screencapping it. The way his fingers slowly press into her arms is just fantastic.

and the simple ways they put a glimmer into this shot without it being transformed from the basement dance-studio is also fantastic...

I’m still not sure if I’m going to watch this drama, though I am following the story. It will definitely depend on the treatment of the issues looming up. But I’m halfway convinced just based on the way it looks and the performances by the stars.

For instance, Lee Dong-Wook is a little odd-looking to me, but the captures of his expressions pull you right into the moment. And he looks smoking in his shirtsleeves. I won’t lie to you.

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while I’m waiting for Protect the Boss to be subtitled (hurry up, people!)

have a gratuitous art-shot from City Hunter, may it live forever:

someone was *really* pleased with themselves when they set this one up

This whole scene was about the unspoken, things we know and the characters don’t, and so the open-ended focus and back-profiles are just good cinematography as far as I can tell…

awwww, you GUYS. I'm so glad you get along!

The space is both obvious, but not awkward. And I notice, that the scenes of the president are all very uncluttered but not high-style, either. The only really exciting place in the Blue House is the security room, actually. This choice, to not glorify or stiltify the national headquarters, is one that both makes the tension not about lifestyle but moral code, and makes the accessibility of these places to our main characters much smoother.

And stuff. Probably.

Last: gratuitous art shot of Himself.

you're welcome.

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